Stella Spoils 10.30.17

Kris

Email Template
Rise & Conquer   |   To The Victor Go The Spoils   |   View this email in your browser
M O N D A Y   1 0 . 3 0 . 1 7
W H O   W E ' R E    F O L L O W I N G

@MARISAHAMPE

Jamaica

@SAYSTHEFOX

Mt Pilatus, Switzerland

@FINDUSLOST

Tenerife, Spain

W H A T    W E ' R E    E Y E I N G

Corduroy is back with a punch and it kind of feels like the 90s is popping up everywhere. But if that means a season with pieces likes this one from the Copenhagen-based Ganni I'm all about it. In a winter appropriate "Rosin Green", these mid rise pants in cozy cord feature a relaxed fit, dropped crotch and a straight leg. Get them below.

View Details
W H A T    W E ' R E    L I S T E N I N G    T O
W H A T    W E ' R E    R E A D I N G
THE PARIS REVIEW

Like most of us, Mark Twain hated writing checks to other people. But there were times when he happily paid out large sums. Issuing a check for $200,000 drawn on the United States Bank of New York on February 27, 1886, for example, made him almost giddy. The check was made out to Julia Dent Grant, the widow of Ulysses S. Grant, the former president of the United States and commanding general of the Union Army, who had died of cancer the summer before, just after completing his remembrances of the Civil War. That payment represented the first profits from sales of volume one of the Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant, published only a few months earlier by Charles L. Webster and Company, a start-up publishing house Twain had established two years before. He had installed a nephew, Charles “Charley” Webster, as its business manager. Webster got his name on the letterhead and a salary, but that’s about all he got out of the position, besides aggravation. Twain made all the business and financial decisions, except when he didn’t feel like it.

C O P Y    &    S H A R E    Y O U R    I N V I T E    L I N K    O N    F A C E B O O K
F O L L O W    U S